Camping trips are always fun, especially when you have a large group of friends to tag along. However, the same fun trip can sometimes turn dark and gloomy when you either end up in the middle of nowhere or have an injured companion. Unfortunately, when you’re camping, you’re probably a little far off the main city and therefore getting to the nearest hospital can take some time. This can be especially troublesome when the sun’s gone down. 

Therefore, anytime you leave for a camping trip, there are some essentials that you always carry along. A full fledged first aid kit with all the essentials will ensure that most of your injuries are tended to at the moment so you can get it patched up the next day at the clinic. 

Insect Spray and Sunscreen

Insect Spray and Sunscreen

We’re starting small here. Rather than jumping onto blood clots and broken bones, we’ll start with the basics that you must carry. An incest spray will prove to be your safe haven when you’re out in the woods at night. Any light source that you’ve got is going to be very inviting to the bugs around you. A sunscreen will save you from the sun burns during the day. You can add other calming lotions like calamine lotion or any anti-itch, anti-rash products that’ll make the trip more comfortable for you. 

Bandages, Gauze, Thermometer and Antiseptic

Now onto the real stuff. If you’re with a group of people, at least one of you will get injured. Maybe a thorn gets stuck in your hand, a scratch from a bush or if you’re lucky enough, you might be the one tumbling down due an inclination. In such a situation you need clotting gauze or powder to stop the wounds from bleeding too much, some cotton and bandages to cover it up and antiseptics to stop the wound from getting infected or inflamed. Since infected wounds can also lead to changes in body temperature, you should carry a thermometer along as well. 

Heat Pack and Cold Compress

Heat Pack and Cold Compress

When we’re talking about injuries, not every one of those end in a wound. Instead, you can have a very swollen leg or a barely moving neck the next day. In such a case, you’re better off using a heat pack or a cold compress, but make sure you know when to use which one. When your muscles and joints seem too stiff and immobile, you can use a heat pack to loosen up your muscles. On the other hand, if you’ve injured your body to the point of excessive swelling, a cold compress can help reduce the inflammation and therefore bring down the swelling. 

Epi-pen and Allergy Medication

Your allergy medication is an obvious one. Not just you but all your companions should be well aware of any allergies that they might have and should carry their allergy medications on the trip. Apart from these medications, carrying an epi-pen can be a life saving medication in the worst of conditions. Though not used often, an epi-pen can come in handy when one of the campers goes through an extreme allergic reaction, one that they need medical assistance for. Since the nearest hospital is going to be a few hours away, your best bet is an epi-pen. Make sure you learn exactly how to use it before administering the dose to someone. 

Emergency Blankets

Emergency Blankets

Camping sites are often out in the open, areas that face regular and random temperature fluctuations daily. In other words, the temperature may drop many degrees at night. Even when you’re carrying or wearing warm clothes, carrying an emergency blanket can save you or your friend from hypothermia. 

Oral Rehydration Solution (ORS)

Loss of fluids due to diarrhea or sudden dehydration due to a heatstroke can be really harmful for you and the gang. Dehydration isn’t something to be taken lightly and therefore you should always be prepared with a packet of ORS to add to the water you’re drinking. A mixture of sugar and salt, this helps rehydrate users without requiring them to drink too much water. You can make your own ORS solution by adding salt and sugar to water. 

When on a camping trip, you probably don’t have a close protection officer tagging along with you. This means that you will be solely responsible for your health and safety. Therefore, you must always keep your first aid kit handy, no matter where you’re going, especially when going on a camping trip.